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Harmful Myths Surrounding Social Security

Harmful Myths Surrounding Social Security

The topic of Social Security benefits can be a tricky one. Known for its less than clear guidelines, those looking to claim their benefits are likely to draw their own conclusions about how Social Security works. For residents looking to tackle Social Security in Ohio, hiring a SSI Attorney in Cleveland will be the best solution to clearing up any confusion that may come up. In the meantime, check out some debunked common myths about Social Security and learn the truth behind them!

1. When you claim your benefits doesn’t matter

Do not fall for this rumor. While it is possible to claim benefits as early as 62, it’s probably of your best interest to wait it out a bit. Why you ask? The longer you wait to claim benefits, the greater the amount of payments you will continuously receive; the amount will not increase once you have initiated the claim.

2. Your ex-husband/wife can’t claim Social Security benefits on you

It looks like your former spouse may still be tied to you when it comes to Social Security benefits. That’s right: your ex is capable of collecting a portion of your benefits. Possibly. If you were involved in a marriage for ten years or more, your ex-wife or husband can collect if they are single. The most one can do to combat their former spouse receiving their benefits is to the delay the process of claim by waiting to collect on their own. Let’s just hope you have only one long-term marriage that ended in divorce! Even more reason to be picky about who you share a last name with.

3. Social Security benefit decisions can not be reversed

No, Social Security claims are not written in stone. If for some reason you change your mind about when you want to claim your benefits, withdrawing your claim within the time period of a year from initial filing is all that has to be done. While you will have to repay any benefits you claimed in the meantime, it’s better than attempting to reverse the claim later and subsequently earning a lower, delayed rate.